The Cold War is over. Right?
February 23rd, 2014
03:31 PM ET

The Cold War is over. Right?

By Greg Clary

Gay rights, Edward Snowden, Syria and now Ukraine: They're all recent issues in which the United States and Russia have had disagreements.

Tension has always seemed to exist between the two countries, and that's certainly been the case for President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some days, it almost seems like the Cold War never went away.

In the latest example, Ukraine, it appears the Russian-backed government of President Viktor Yanukovych has been removed from office after deadly protests, setting up a power vacuum in a country known for Russian meddling.

The U.S. stands with Ukrainian opposition forces hoping to increase democratic reforms and decrease influence from Moscow, while Russia slams the opposition, saying they failed to honor international agreements made last week aimed at ending the crisis.

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Filed under: Putin • Russia
January 19th, 2014
12:26 PM ET

U.S. lawmakers: Winter Olympics aren’t safe

By CNN's Greg Clary

Members of both the House and Senate Intelligence Committees say they are extremely concerned about security surrounding next month’s Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said he wouldn’t go to the games himself – “and I don't think I would send my family,” he told CNN’s State of the Union.

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Filed under: Intelligence • Rep. Mike Rogers
November 2nd, 2013
07:24 PM ET

Supporter paints picture of Snowden’s life in Moscow

By CNN’s Greg Clary

National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden has now been in Moscow for more than five months while Russia considers whether to grant his request for permanent asylum. But his day-to-day activities remain largely a mystery.

One person who knows more than most about Snowden’s situation is Jesselyn Radack, who met with him recently in Moscow.

Radack is a member of the whistleblower-support organization, Government Accountability Project, and a former ethics adviser to the Justice Department. She became a whistleblower herself after raising concerns about the interrogation of “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh.

Radack says security is still paramount for Snowden—she and the other visitors weren’t told the location of their meeting because of security concerns.

“It appeared to be a hotel, somewhere, but I don't know Moscow, so I didn't recognize where we were really,” Radack said.

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Filed under: Edward Snowden • NSA • Russia
Head of NSA rethinks intel gathering strategies
November 1st, 2013
12:23 AM ET

Head of NSA rethinks intel gathering strategies

In the wake of revelations the U.S. spied on some of its closest partners, the head of the National Security Agency said Thursday he thinks some relationships with allies are more important in the fight against terrorism than the gathering of intelligence.

A week after reports the United States was spying on German Chancellor Angela Merkel and potentially 30 or more other heads of state, Gen. Keith Alexander said there may be more effective ways of gathering the intelligence Washington needs without jeopardizing crucial relationships with allies.
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Filed under: Edward Snowden • NSA
Rand Paul: U.S. involvement in Syria a 'mistake'
September 1st, 2013
11:24 AM ET

Rand Paul: U.S. involvement in Syria a 'mistake'

By CNN's Greg Clary

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, said Sunday the United States should avoid military involvement in Syria. He challenged Secretary of State John Kerry on his assertion America should launch a strike.

"He's famous for saying, 'How can you ask a man to be the last one to die for a mistake?' I would ask John Kerry, 'How can you ask a man to be the first one to die for a mistake?'" Paul said on NBC's "Meet The Press."

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Filed under: Syria
Key U.S. lawmakers: Expect strike in Syria
August 25th, 2013
12:03 PM ET

Key U.S. lawmakers: Expect strike in Syria

Two key members of congressional foreign affairs panels say they expect the United States to strike Syria following reports of chemical weapons attacks in that country last week, though other lawmakers interviewed Sunday cautioned that unilateral action would be misguided.

"I think we will respond in a surgical way and I hope the president, as soon as we get back to Washington, will ask for authorization from Congress to do something in a very surgical and proportional way. Something that gets their attention, that causes them to understand that we are not going to put up with that kind of activity," Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said on "Fox News Sunday."

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Filed under: Syria
Osprey aircraft deployed for first time in support of Marine One
August 10th, 2013
07:00 PM ET

Osprey aircraft deployed for first time in support of Marine One

By CNN’s Greg Clary

(CNN) – Marine Corps MV-22 Ospreys, aircraft that take off vertically, provided a dramatic new look for President Barack Obama’s travel detail as he and the first lady began a Martha’s Vineyard vacation on Saturday.

The Ospreys – making their presidential debut - shuttled White House staff, media and Secret Service members from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod.

The sleek tilt-rotor aircraft can take off like a helicopter but fly like an airplane.

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Filed under: Marines
Military court overturns Marine's Iraq murder conviction
June 26th, 2013
10:34 PM ET

Military court overturns Marine's Iraq murder conviction

By CNN's Greg Clary

The military's equivalent of the Supreme Court overturned the conviction Wednesday of a Marine found guilty of murdering a civilian during the Iraq war, saying he was interrogated after asking for a lawyer.

A court originally sentenced Sgt. Lawrence Hutchins III to 15 years in prison for the murder of 52-year-old Hashim Awad in April of 2006.

Prosecutors said Hutchins, who led a Marine squad that dragged Awad from his home, shot him in the face several times and then placed a shovel and AK-47 near his body to make it appear he was an insurgent burying roadside bombs.

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Filed under: Iraq
June 21st, 2013
06:00 AM ET

Wounded soldiers help Boston Marathon bombing victim

By Greg Clary and Barbara Starr

"I'm getting there," said Boston Marathon bombing victim J.P. Norden to Sgt. Luis Remache, a U.S. Marine and a double leg amputee.

"You'll get there, it's not that bad," Remache said.

It's not always common that a grizzled military veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan can relate with a civilian, but that's exactly what happened time and again on Wednesday at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center just outside Washington.
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