Defense secretary tries to ease employee fears about potential cuts
Sec. of Defense Leon Panetta greets troops during a recent trip to Kabul.
December 21st, 2012
04:27 PM ET

Defense secretary tries to ease employee fears about potential cuts

By Larry Shaughnessy

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta sent a memo this week to all the troops and civilians who work for him to address concerns about the mandatory spending cuts that would occur if the president and lawmakers do not reach a budget agreement by the end of the year.

In it, Panetta wrote that if the procedure, known as sequestration, were to occur, it "would not necessarily require immediate reductions in spending."

He also wrote that "under sequestration, we would still have funds available after Jan. 2, 2013, but our overall funding for the remainder of the year would be reduced."

It's a very different spin on the sequestration from Panetta, who in the past said it would be a "disaster." If this "meat ax" approach to budget cutting were used, he said, it would "hollow out the force."

The cuts are slated to be across the board, totaling roughly $500 billion over 10 years.

Panetta tried to reassure the troops that "the president indicated his intent to exercise his legal authority to exempt military personnel" from the mandatory cuts.

But he couldn't make the same promise to the Defense Department's million or so civilian employees.

Instead he said, "Should we have to operate under reduced funding levels for an extended period of time, we may have to consider furloughs or other actions in the future."

Asked about the change of tone, a senior defense official said, "The secretary continues to believe that sequestration would be devastating and is puzzled that Congress can't reach a deal."

The same official said the memo reflects the Office of Management and Budget's view of the issue, especially with respect to furloughs.

Panetta wrapped up the memo by writing, "I want to assure you that we will do our very best to provide clear information about the status of events as they unfold."

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Filed under: Congress • Defense Spending • Democrats • Panetta • Panetta • Pentagon • Politics • Republican • Security Brief • Sequestration • White House
July 11th, 2012
09:48 PM ET

DoD's China report too skimpy, House Republicans say

Update 7/12:  Pentagon spokesman George Little said the page limit directive has been rescinded.

By Larry Shaughnessy

Rep. Buck McKeon, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, led a group of Republicans in a news conference Wednesday to attack the Department of Defense over the brevity of a report about China's military.

The report is 19 pages long with and additional 33 pages of appendixes.

"I think that is outrageous," said McKeon, R-California. "We can't do our job if the department doesn't give us adequate information to do the things that we are required to do."

The DoD is required by law to report to Congress about China's military. Last year's report was 84 pages long with appendices.
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Filed under: China • McKeon • Republican
US Navy: 'Hollow' force or 'the best in the world'?
An LCS underway. The modern warships are a key part of the Obama's vision for the Navy's near future.
May 29th, 2012
02:35 AM ET

US Navy: 'Hollow' force or 'the best in the world'?

By Larry Shaughnessy

One of the many issues likely to be batted around during this year's presidential election is the status of the U.S. Navy.

Several times on the campaign trail, Gov. Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican nominee, has criticized the Obama administration's handling of the Navy.

"Do you realize our Navy is now smaller than any time since 1917?" Romney said during a campaign rally in South Carolina last January.
FULL POST

Congress Wars: Battle for the defense budget
May 28th, 2012
02:00 AM ET

Congress Wars: Battle for the defense budget

By Mike Mount, Senior National Security Producer

In what is shaping up to be a classic congressional right vs. left fight over defense and war funding, both the House and Senate are gearing up to battle over some expected and not-so-expected items in the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act.

On Thursday, the Senate Armed Services Committee passed its version of the bill, showing its hand to members of the House of Representatives on what it felt should be authorized for military spending.

The act authorizes spending limits and sets defense policy, but it does not actually appropriate the funds.

The committee version must still pass a full Senate vote. The House signed off on its bill this month. While a date has yet to be announced, both the final House and Senate versions will go through extensive negotiations to hammer out a final version of the legislation, expected in the fall.

Both bills have numerous amendments that will be debated and fought over in the coming months. Keep an eye on these five if you like political fireworks.

FULL POST

CNN Poll: Iran a bigger threat to U.S. than North Korea
April 18th, 2012
04:08 PM ET

CNN Poll: Iran a bigger threat to U.S. than North Korea

By CNN's Political Unit

Americans see Iran as a bigger threat to the United States than North Korea, according to a new poll.

The CNN/ORC International Poll released Wednesday showed 81% view Iran as a very serious or moderate threat to the U.S. Three quarters of Americans said North Korea represents a similar threat.

The secretary of defense has said that Iran is viewed as a more significant threat because if it obtained nuclear weapons the country would destabilize the entire region. FULL POST


Filed under: Iran • North Korea • Panetta • Politics
April 1st, 2012
01:10 PM ET

Rep. Ryan apologizes for comment about generals

By Ashley Killough

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan said Sunday he misspoke earlier in the week when he accused military officials of not being honest about the Pentagon budget.

“I really misspoke,” Ryan said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “I didn’t mean to make that kind of an impression. So, I was clumsy in how I was describing the point I was trying to make.”

On Thursday, the Wisconsin congressman said senior military leaders had been misleading when they defended a decrease in Pentagon spending proposals. He argued that the generals were not “giving us their true advice” and accused them of toeing an administration line.

"I think there is a lot of budget smoke and mirrors in the (administration's) Pentagon budget, which is not really a true, honest and accurate budget. When you confront military experts – retired or active – they concede these things to us," Ryan said.

Read more about the military's response on CNN's Political Ticker.


Filed under: 2012 Election • Budget • Dempsey • Military • Pentagon • Politics • Republican
CNN poll: Afghan war support hits new low
March 30th, 2012
05:00 AM ET

CNN poll: Afghan war support hits new low

Support for the war in Afghanistan has fallen to an all-time low with the majority of Americans saying the U.S. should withdraw all of its troops from Afghanistan before the 2014 deadline set by the Obama administration, according to CNN's latest poll.

The CNN/ORC International survey released Friday indicated only 25% of Americans favored the war in the Asian country. A majority of Republicans voiced opposition to it, for the first time since the war began in 2001.

Just 37% of the general public said things are going well for the U.S. in Afghanistan, while only 34% said America is winning the war. The approval likely contributed to the 55% of those surveyed who said the U.S. should remove all of its troops from the country before 2014.

Read more about the poll on CNN's Political Ticker 


Filed under: Afghanistan • Military • Obama • Politics
Truth Squad: NATO ally ruled by 'Islamic terrorists?'
Photo: AFP/Getty Images
January 17th, 2012
06:11 AM ET

Truth Squad: NATO ally ruled by 'Islamic terrorists?'

By Matt Smith

Editor's note: Part of the CNN Republican debate fact-checking series

(CNN) - Texas Gov. Rick Perry was asked if Turkey should remain within the NATO alliance, during Monday night's Republican presidential debate.

The statement: "Obviously when you have a country that is being ruled by, what many would perceive to be Islamic terrorists, when you start seeing that type of activity against their own citizens, then yes - not only is it time for us to have a conversation about whether or not they belong to be in NATO, but it's time for the United States, when we look at their foreign aid, to go to zero with it." - Perry, during Monday night's Fox News-Wall Street Journal debate. Perry went on to put Turkey in the same league as neighboring Syria and Iran, warning that the United States needs to show Ankara "that we're going to have to be dealt with."

The facts:

Turkey is not ruled by "Islamic terrorists." It is led by a party with Islamist roots, the Justice and Development Party, or AKP, which has ruled Turkey since 2002.

FULL POST


Filed under: Asia • Politics • Security Brief • Turkey
December 21st, 2011
12:25 PM ET

More than half of Americans think Iraq war ended in stalemate

By the CNN Political Unit

Most Americans agree with the decision to end the war in Iraq, according to a CNN/ORC International poll released Wednesday. Almost eight in ten said they support removal of combat troops from that country by the end of this year.

And although 96% are proud of U.S. troops who served in Iraq, just one in three consider the war a victory and more than half call it a stalemate.

President Obama announced the full withdrawal of troops from Iraq by the year's end in October. Now, two-thirds say they oppose the war and more think the U.S. made a mistake sending troops to Iraq in the first place 53% to 46% over those who do not think it was a mistake.

Americans are similarly divided over whether they agree with then-Sen. Barack Obama's opinion that it was a "dumb" decision to send troops to Iraq in 2003 – 51% say it was dumb and 45% say it was smart. FULL POST


Filed under: Iraq • Military • Obama • Politics
Sitting atop the intel: The case file on Congressman Mike Rogers
November 23rd, 2011
11:19 AM ET

Sitting atop the intel: The case file on Congressman Mike Rogers

By Senior National Security Producer Suzanne Kelly

Editor's note: This is part of a Security Clearance series, Case File. CNN Senior National Security Producer Suzanne Kelly profiles key members of the security and intelligence community.

Being the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee comes with its own unique set of challenges. For starters, every day begins with a mountain of briefings on subjects that all seem pressing when it comes to keeping the country safe: ongoing operations against al Qaeda, cyber espionage being waged against American companies, Russians revamping their nuclear fleet, and Iran's nuclear intentions.

As chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Rep. Mike Rogers helps oversee America's 17 Intelligence agencies. He is one of only four members of the House or Senate who hold such a high clearance level. The intelligence information he receives is restricted to just the chairmen and the ranking members of both the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. It's a responsibility that can, and often does, keep him up at night.

"The intelligence committee is very different in the sense that its probably more engaged in activities than any other committee," says Rogers, R-Michigan. "We have a constant stream of information."
FULL POST

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