April 12th, 2013
07:14 PM ET

Pentagon intel suggested N. Korea nuke capability previously

By Pam Benson and Chris Lawrence

Despite the uproar over a disclosure this week of Pentagon intelligence concluding North Korea may be able to deliver a nuclear weapon on a ballistic missile, it's not the first time the Defense Intelligence Agency has suggested Pyongyang had that capability.

Since 2005, two former DIA chiefs have raised the possibility during congressional testimony.

At a Senate Armed Service Committee hearing in April 2005, then-DIA director Vice Admiral Lowell Jacoby acknowledged the possibility in response to a question about whether North Korea had the capability to put a nuclear device on a missile.

"The assessment is that they have the capability to do that," Jacoby said.
FULL POST

April 5th, 2013
07:25 PM ET

North Korea: Hints of calming rhetoric

In North Korea Friday, CNN’s told, two medium-range missiles are in their launchers, loaded and ready to go.

The White House says it won’t be surprised if Kim Jong Un orders those missiles to be fired as a test of his military power.

The communist leader is sending all sorts of signals about his next move and when it might happen, including an ominous new warning to foreign diplomats.

To give us the global view on this unfolding story, our Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr.


Filed under: Diplomacy • Kim Jong-un • Lavrov • Military • Missile Defense • North Korea • Russia • Security Brief • South Korea • US Forces Korea • White House
How close is North Korea to a nuclear missile?
A North Korean soldier stands guard in front of an Unha-3 rocket at the Tangachai-ri Space Center on April 8, 2012.
January 29th, 2013
06:45 PM ET

How close is North Korea to a nuclear missile?

By Kevin Voigt, CNN

North Korea's intention to carry out a new nuclear test, coming on the heels of December's successful satellite launch, suggests that Pyongyang is moving forward toward developing a nuclear warhead and a deliverable missile system, experts say. The question remains: How close are they?

The answer, like the cloistered "hermit kingdom," remains largely a mystery as does much of its nuclear program.

"It's a question over the delivery system and the reliability of those systems," said Daniel Pinkston, senior analyst for the International Crisis Group covering Northeast Asia. "That is essentially unknown, or known by a few people inside North Korea."

FULL STORY

Filed under: Missile Defense • North Korea • Nuclear
Yemen, U.S. intercept ship with 'large cache of illegal arms'
January 28th, 2013
11:29 PM ET

Yemen, U.S. intercept ship with 'large cache of illegal arms'

By Barbara Starr and Greg Botelho

Yemeni authorities working with the U.S. Navy intercepted a ship carrying a "substantial" cache of "illegal arms" such as surface-to-air missiles, potent explosives and rocket-propelled grenades, a U.S. official and Yemen's government said Monday.

The incident took place in Yemeni territorial waters in the Arabian Sea last Wednesday, according to a statement issued five days later from Yemen's embassy in Washington.

FULL STORY
NATO: Patriot missile battery operational on Syrian border
A leftist clashes with Turkish policemen during a January 21 protest in Adana against NATO's installation of Patriot missiles.
January 28th, 2013
05:32 AM ET

NATO: Patriot missile battery operational on Syrian border

By Melissa Gray and Greg Botelho

The first of six Patriot missile batteries intended to protect Turkey from Syrian threats is operational along the countries' shared border, NATO said Saturday.

The other five batteries, which NATO says are to be for defensive purposes only, are expected to be in place in coming days.

Read more: Mission impossible? Creating the 'Syria of the future' right now

NATO foreign ministers decided in December to deploy the batteries after Syria launched Scud missiles near the Turkish border. In October, errant Syrian artillery shells hit the Turkish border town of Akcakale.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Missile Defense • NATO • Syria • Turkey
U.S. troops arrive in Turkey; rebels battle for airport in Syria
A patriot missile is launched.
January 4th, 2013
03:11 AM ET

U.S. troops arrive in Turkey; rebels battle for airport in Syria

By Ben Brumfield

U.S. troops arrived in Turkey on Friday to man Patriot missile defense batteries near the Syrian border, according to Turkish state media.

Syria has previously launched Scud missiles at cities near the Turkish border in a desperate bid to extend its firepower.

In response, the U.S., Germany and the Netherlands deployed Patriot air defense missiles to the border region to intercept any Syrian ballistic missiles.

The missiles and troops will be under the overall control of NATO, but the missiles will be operated by U.S. forces.

A group of 27 U.S. troops landed in Gaziantep, Turkey, where they will survey the Patriot deployment, according to Turkish state news agency, Anadolu.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Missile Defense • Syria • Turkey
How the Patriot deployment to Turkey will work
A patriot missile is launched
December 14th, 2012
11:29 PM ET

How the Patriot deployment to Turkey will work

By Barbara Starr

U.S. troops will be in direct position for the first time to take action against the government of Syrian President Bashr al-Assad with the deployment of 400 American forces and two Patriot missile batteries in Turkey, possibly as soon as mid-January.

The missiles and troops will be under the overall control of NATO. But the missiles will be operated by U.S. forces with the ability to choose whether to override computer systems that automatically order firing against any incoming Scud missiles, according to U.S. military officials.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced that he had signed orders for the Patriot missiles, emphasizing that he was sending a clear message to Syria that NATO will defend Turkey.

Syrian rocket and artillery fire have landed in Turkey and Syria has launched short range Scuds close to the Turkish border.
FULL POST

United States to send troops and Patriot missiles to Turkey
December 14th, 2012
06:53 AM ET

United States to send troops and Patriot missiles to Turkey

The United States is to deploy 400 troops and two Patriot air-defense missile batteries to Turkey in the coming weeks to defend against potential threats from Syria, defense officials said Friday.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta signed the order en route to Turkey, where he is visiting Incirlik Air Base, Pentagon spokesman George Little told reporters.

Little declined to give details of where the two batteries would be located, or to specify how long the deployment would last.

"The purpose of this deployment is to signal very strongly that the United States, working closely with our NATO allies is going to support the defense of Turkey, especially with potential threats emanating from Syria," he said.

Turkey and NATO insist the Patriot missile deployment would be used only for defense.

CNN's Laura Smith-Spark contributed to this report.

Post by:
Filed under: Missile Defense • NATO • Panetta • Syria • Turkey
December 10th, 2012
03:10 AM ET

North Korea extends launch window for rocket after technical problems

By Jethro Mullen

North Korea has extended the window for a controversial long-range rocket launch by one week after finding technical problems in an engine, state media reported Monday.

The planned launch has been widely condemned by other countries like the United States and South Korea, which say it's cover for testing ballistic missile technology. The North insists the launch is aimed at putting a scientific satellite in orbit.

When it announced its plans on December 1, the reclusive North Korean regime said it intended to carry out the launch between Monday and December 22. But on Saturday, the state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said the launch may be delayed.

In a new article Monday, KCNA reported that scientists and technicians had "found technical deficiency in the first-stage control engine module of the rocket," citing a spokesman for the Korean Committee of Space Technology.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Missile Defense • North Korea
November 27th, 2012
08:45 PM ET

Second North Korean missile launch would be unprecedented

By Jennifer Rizzo

While new satellite images show preparations for what is believed to be a coming long-range missile launch by North Korea, a second attempt in 2012 would be unprecedented, a top satellite image analyst told Security Clearance.

There have been four launches of this scale since 1998, including a failed attempt in April of this year. A second launch in 2012 would be the first time North Korea has launched two systems of this class, their largest missile class, in less than three years.

"The fact that they are now apparently preparing for a second launch in 2012 indicated that the decision to do this was made at the highest level," said DigitalGlobe analyst Joe Bermudez.

The North Koreans are looking for "maximum political impact" domestically, regionally and internationally with a test launch such as this, according to Bermudez, calling it a "very politically motivated event."

The timing of a launch at the end of this year would coincide with many consequential events, said Bermudez.

South Korea will be launching a rocket into space by the end of this week. North Korea and Japan will be holding another set of bilateral talks early in December and the South Korean presidential election will take place in less than a month. North Korea watchers say new leader Kim Jung Un may be responding to internal political pressure from hard-liners to send a message.
FULL POST

« older posts