Senators: Benghazi attack 'likely preventable'
The U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya following an attack on September 11, 2012
January 15th, 2014
09:26 PM ET

Senators: Benghazi attack 'likely preventable'

By Jason Hanna and Evan Perez

The deadly attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, was "likely preventable" based on known security shortfalls and prior warnings that the security situation there was deteriorating, the majority of the Senate Intelligence Committee concluded in a report released on Wednesday.

Separately, the findings also noted what the FBI had told the panel - that 15 people cooperating with its investigation had been killed in Benghazi, undercutting the investigation. It was not clear if the killings were related to the probe.

Moreover, it said that people linked with various al Qaeda-related groups in North Africa and elsewhere participated in the September 11, 2012, attack, but investigators haven't been able to determine whether any one group was in command.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Benghazi • Congress • Libya
Unclassified documents reveal more details about Benghazi attack
January 14th, 2014
03:57 AM ET

Unclassified documents reveal more details about Benghazi attack

(CNN) - The House Armed Services Committee on Monday released hundreds of pages of transcripts of previously classified testimony about the September 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. The testimony focuses primarily on the military posture before, during, and after the attack, which left U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three other Americans dead.

In the testimony, senior military officials said that despite general warnings about the possibility of terrorist attacks around the world because of the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, there were no discussions related to any specific threat in Libya. As a result, additional military assets were not deployed. FULL POST

November 10th, 2013
11:31 AM ET

Graham to keep holds on Obama nominees

By CNN's Jason Seher

Sen. Lindsey Graham vowed on Sunday that he would continue to block President Barack Obama's nominations until Congress hears from Benghazi survivors.

The South Carolina lawmaker told CNN's Candy Crowley on "State of the Union" that he will place holds on any nomination put forth by the administration unless it makes available five survivors of the September 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, Libya, who have been interviewed by State Department investigators but remain out of Congress' reach.

"I've been trying for a year to get these interviews without holds," Graham said.

Graham scoffed at any notion his maneuver amounts to political grandstanding, portraying his actions as a last resort and couching them as part of "trying to perform oversight."

"I don't want to hold anybody. All I want to do is talk to the survivors," Graham insisted. "I'm not trying to prosecute a crime."

Graham announced his intention to hold all of Obama’s nominations the day after CBS's "60 Minutes" aired a controversial report on the attacks. The newsmagazine has since pulled its report, saying that its eyewitness, a British contractor stationed in Libya, lied to reporter Lara Logan about what he saw on the ground.

When pressed by Crowley about whether the debunking of the piece would impact his stance, Graham told her it wouldn’t.

"I never asked for the British contractor. I didn't know he existed," Graham said.

New report: Top officials escaped blame for Benghazi
September 16th, 2013
01:42 PM ET

New report: Top officials escaped blame for Benghazi

By Jamie Crawford

A commission that investigated last year's terror attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four people lacked sufficient independence and did not hold senior officials accountable, a congressional report said on Monday.

The House Oversight Committee conclusion also raised new questions about the relatively short time frame taken by the Accountability Review Board to investigate the attack by armed militants and issue its findings.

"The ARB operated under significant time pressure, completing its work and issuing a final report in just over two months," the report found.

"For some, including (the State Department), this report represented the final word on the internal failures that contributed to the tragedy in Benghazi. For others, however, the report overvalued certain facts, overlooked others, and failed to address systemic issues that have long plagued the State Department," it said.
FULL POST


Filed under: Benghazi • Congress • Libya
May 9th, 2013
05:57 PM ET

Mother of Benghazi victim: Hearing didn't give answers

Parents who lose children in national calamities come to represent a pain and grief and importance that it is difficult to ignore.

Pat Smith, mother of Benghazi victim Sean Smith, a State Department information officer, listened to the Benghazi hearing on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.  In an interview on "The Lead with Jake Tapper," she said she did not get the answers she was looking for.

Watch and read about it here.


Filed under: Benghazi • Libya