August 23rd, 2013
04:08 PM ET

Bradley Manning wants to live as a woman

Convicted spy Bradley Manning wants to get hormone therapy in prison. CNN's Chris Lawrence reports.

RELATED STORY: Bradley Manning wants to live as a woman, be known as Chelsea


Filed under: Bradley Manning
Bradley Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison
US Army Private First Class Bradley Manning arrives alongside military officials at a US military court facility to hear his sentence in his trial at Fort Meade, Maryland.
August 21st, 2013
11:39 AM ET

Bradley Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison

By Paul Courson

For leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents, Bradley Manning is set to spend the next three decades in prison.

A military judge on Wednesday sentenced Manning to 35 years in prison - less than the 60 years prosecutors sought, as well as the 90 years he could have received.

The former Army intelligence analyst - convicted in July of stealing 750,000 pages of classified documents and videos and disseminating them to WikiLeaks - will be credited for the roughly three and a half years he's already served in detention.

The judge, Army Col. Denise Lind, also reduced his rank from private first class to private, and ordered him to be dishonorably discharged. Manning also will forfeit pay and benefits.

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Filed under: Bradley Manning • WikiLeaks
Military prosecutors seek at least 60 years for Manning
August 19th, 2013
06:27 PM ET

Military prosecutors seek at least 60 years for Manning

By Paul Courson

Army private Bradley Manning acted as a "determined insider" in leaking a trove of classified documents about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and should spend a minimum of 60 years in jail, a military prosecutor said at his sentencing hearing on Monday.

Capt. Joe Morrow told Col. Denise Lind, the judge overseeing the former intelligence analyst's court-martial, that such punishment for the historic and unauthorized release of hundreds of thousands of documents and other information to WikiLeaks would ensure that "we never see a number like this again."

Defense attorney David Coombs portrayed Manning as an excellent candidate for rehabilitation, and that he should not be left to "rot in jail."
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Manning's possible maximum sentence cut
August 6th, 2013
03:20 PM ET

Manning's possible maximum sentence cut

(CNN) - A military judge on Tuesday consolidated certain criminal convictions in Bradley Manning's national security leak case, reducing his maximum possible prison sentence from 136 years to 90.

Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, was convicted of stealing and disseminating 750,000 pages of classified documents and videos to WikiLeaks.

The leaks dealt with U.S. military strategy in Iraq to State Department cables outlining foreign relationships. They also included a secret military video from the Iraq war.

Col. Denise Lind acquitted Manning of the most grievous charge of aiding the enemy, which carried a maximum life sentence.

But she found him guilty of other counts that include violations of the Espionage Act. He earlier had pleaded guilty to lesser charges.

Lind could decide not to slap him with the maximum for each count. She may rule that he'll serve the sentences concurrently, rather than consecutively.

It may take several days for a sentencing decision.

Manning's lawyers had asked the court martial to merge several of the convictions because they represented "prosecutorial overreach" and "unreasonable multiplication of the charges."

The government is still presenting witnesses during the sentencing phase at Fort Meade, Maryland.

The defense is expected to present several witnesses as well.

July 31st, 2013
03:28 PM ET

What's next for Bradley Manning? Prison time could add up for convicted leaker

By Ben Brumfield and Barbara Starr

As Pfc. Bradley Manning's sentencing phase began Wednesday morning, the convicted leaker has already tallied 1,274 days behind bars.

The question now is how many more of the potential 136 years he'll serve.

The military will give Manning credit for each of his 1,162 days of pre-trial confinement, plus the judge, Col. Denise Lind, credited Manning with an additional 112 days for the harsh treatment he suffered while being held at a Marine Corps Base Quantico brig.

The defense has also filed motions to have four of the charges on which he was found guilty merged into two. Lind isn't expected to rule on that motion before Friday.

Lind acquitted Manning of the most grievous charge of aiding the enemy. Had she convicted him of that one charge, he could have spent life in prison without the possibility of parole.

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July 30th, 2013
03:47 PM ET

Bradley Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy, guilty on other charges

By Ashley Fantz and Chelsea J. Carter

A military judge has found Pfc. Bradley Manning, accused of the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, not guilty of aiding the enemy - a charge that would have carried a maximum sentence of life in prison.

Manning was also found not guilty of unauthorized possession of information relating to national defense.

He was found guilty of most of the remaining charges against him, with the judge, Col. Denise Lind, accepting only two of the guilty pleas he had made previously to lesser charges. Those two were possession of a video that was marked classified and that he exceeded authority by obtaining a State Department cable.

Though those two counts carry a maximum sentence of two years, the rest of the charges that Manning was found guilty of could lead to a maximum sentence of 136 years in prison. Among the charges Manning was found guilty of - which carry a maximum 10-year sentence - are the theft of more than 700 U.S. Southern Command records, the possession of records pertaining to Afghanistan; the theft of State Department cables and the possession of classified Army documents.

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Verdict in Manning trial to be revealed Tuesday
July 29th, 2013
01:40 PM ET

Verdict in Manning trial to be revealed Tuesday

By CNN Staff

After spending three years in custody, the man accused of the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history will learn Tuesday whether he has been found guilty of aiding the enemy.

A verdict from the judge in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning will be announced at 1 p.m. ET Tuesday, according to a spokeswoman for the military district of Washington.

If found guilty on the aiding the enemy charge, Manning could be sentenced to life in prison. He has pleaded guilty to nearly a dozen lesser charges that carry a sentence of up to 20 years behind bars.

Whether Manning is a whistle-blower or a traitor who betrayed his country has been hotly debated.

Authorities have accused Manning of delivering three-quarters of million pages of classified documents and videos to the secret-sharing site WikiLeaks - which has never confirmed the soldier was the source of its information. The material covered numerous aspects of U.S. military strategy in Iraq, gave what some called a ground view of events in the Afghanistan war and revealed the inner workings of U.S. State Department diplomacy in leaked cables.

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Filed under: Bradley Manning • WikiLeaks
July 26th, 2013
10:47 AM ET

Snowden and Manning: A tale of accused leakers

CNN's Barbara Starr reports on the similarities – and differences – between Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden.


Filed under: Bradley Manning • Edward Snowden
Post-testimony legal wrangling begins in Manning case
July 15th, 2013
09:52 PM ET

Post-testimony legal wrangling begins in Manning case

By CNN Pentagon Producer Larry Shaughnessy

FORT MEADE, Maryland (CNN) - After years of pretrial delays and legal battles, testimony in the court-martial trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning is all but over but the delays and battles continue.

Last Monday, before presenting witnesses in the case, Manning's defense attorneys filed motions asking the military judge, Col. Denise Lind, to find him not guilty of four of the charges against him.
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Filed under: Bradley Manning • WikiLeaks
Audio from Bradley Manning posted on internet
March 12th, 2013
06:01 PM ET

Audio from Bradley Manning posted on internet

By Carol Cratty and Larry Shaughnessy

Audio of Pfc. Bradley Manning telling a military court that he provided classified information to the WikiLeaks website has been posted on the Internet by the Freedom of the Press Foundation.

"This marks the first time the American public has heard the actual voice of Manning," the group said in a statement Monday.

Access to the military court proceedings for Manning is limited, and observers are not allowed to use recording devices. The foundation did not say how it obtained the audio but complained that the proceedings should be available to the public.

"By releasing this audio recording, we wish to make sure that the voice of this generation's most prolific whistle-blower can be heard - literally - by the world," said the group's statement.
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