January 6th, 2014
05:06 PM ET

5 questions: What's going on in Iraq?

By Elise Labott

Washington (CNN) - The recent fighting in Iraq has posed a serious challenge to Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and his government, raising questions about his ability to hold the country together amid a rising insurgency.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday that the United States will help the Iraqi government in the battle against al Qaeda-linked fighters in western Iraq, but he stressed it won't send troops.
Here are five questions about the deteriorating situation:

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soundoff (17 Responses)
  1. simplefaith

    We cannot get involved again with Iraq. Over ten years of fighting with no results. The people in the Middle East have been fighting each other for thousands of years. Does not 2 trillion dollars or more spent in the war with a nearly busted U.S. economy scare you. My son almost lost all of his eyesight in the last war. Other military soldiers lost limbs and their minds. Please let our military rest. We are not the only nation on the globe that can assist. Let America rest.

    January 9, 2014 at 5:49 pm | Reply
    • Gerald O'Hare

      Thank you, simplefaith. I couldn't agree more!

      January 9, 2014 at 7:37 pm | Reply
  2. John Smith

    America is the root of all terror. America has invaded sixty countries since world war 2.
    In 1953 America overthrow Iran's democratic government Mohammad Mosaddegh and installed a brutal dictator Shah. America helped Shah of Iran to establish secret police and killed thousands of Iranian people.
    During Iran-Iraq war evil America supported Suddam Hossain and killed millions of Iranian people. In 1989, America, is the only country ever, shot down Iran's civilian air plane, killing 290 people.
    In 2003,America invaded Iraq and killed 1,000,000+ innocent Iraqi people and 4,000,000+ Iraqi people were displaced.
    Now America is a failed state with huge debt. Its debt will be 22 trillion by 2015.

    January 8, 2014 at 2:18 pm | Reply
    • Mark Rushing

      Well put, John. You said it all!

      January 8, 2014 at 7:17 pm | Reply
    • George patton

      You forgot to mention above John, the heinous bombing of the Amriya air raid shelter in Baghdad, Iraq on Feb. 13, 1991 during the First Gulf War by two American pilots, slaughtering well over 414 innocent civilians, mostly women, children and the elderly. To this very day, no one has ever been held accountable for this obscene act!!! That still makes my stomach crawl!

      January 8, 2014 at 7:30 pm | Reply
    • B-Low Me

      What a bunch of Moron's. John Smith you have NO idea what you are talking about!!! You've been fighting for Hundred's of years. You – being the Middle East – Learn to speak/write English while you are at it. Easy to put the blame on someone else.Another thing – Iran isn't even worth saving. Worthless piece of sand.

      February 16, 2014 at 4:45 pm | Reply
  3. StanCalif

    What's happening in Iraq is our ill conceived idea that "democracy" solves all problems! Where is democracy succeeding anywhere in the Middle East? Nowhere! It's impossible! These people can only live together under a strong and powerful dictator! Too bad we took out Saddam! Sure, he was brutal but he did have a functioning country!

    January 7, 2014 at 10:23 pm | Reply
    • WERTWERT32452345

      Well put, Stan. Thank you.

      January 8, 2014 at 8:56 am | Reply
  4. Osama Al - Urduni

    This Guy is a member of a sectarian government that alienated the Sunnis for more than 8 years. AL Maliki and his gang left the Sunnis no choice but to hold the weapons to defend their existence. Those are no Al Qaeda members, but ordinary people who found themselves in a hopeless situation. Accusing the opposition of being terrorists has became a fashion in the Arab world. Just look at Al – Assad regime in Syria. Since day one of the peaceful revolution at that time, they start saying we're fighting "The Militias Gangs". How about Egypt? After a military coup, they killed hundreds of civilians and jailing thousands of Mursi supports by the name of fighting terrorism. The same story happing in Iraq now. If things remains as is, the region is going to boil more and more.

    January 7, 2014 at 9:34 pm | Reply
  5. Mark Rushing

    I'm afraid that sooner or later the stupid politicians in Washington will find some kind of excuse to drag this country back into that worthless conflict. Those idiots in Washington don't seem to have enough sense to just mind their own business and let things overseas take their course!

    January 7, 2014 at 7:30 pm | Reply
  6. Random

    What you can learn from this is the islamic gihad, which we identify with AQ, ISIS, etcal is state backed. We notice what ever fledgling group is focused on by that state. Knock one down another pops up.
    It is kind of like fighting a mobster, you can't go for the low hanging fruit. You have to take up the roots. You need to cripple who is paying for it.
    It is obvious you know who that is. But it is seemingly not even considered, to go after the source. Its almost like a game of chess , we find curious new ways to obliterate the pieces on the boards (meaning us, people on both sides) but the decision makers, the ones funding it, or in our analogy the players of the chess game are off limits.
    Find a way to fight the war effectively or submit(step aside for someone who will).

    January 6, 2014 at 10:10 pm | Reply
    • Random

      Effectively what this is , is modern day piracy. Just like in the old days queens and kings supported piracy , attacking the pirate ships will do nothing to stem the flow of new pirates. You would need to dethrone what ever king or queen was funding them and such. The people in charge clearly know this. It is the people who seem not to.

      January 6, 2014 at 10:15 pm | Reply
      • Random

        There are people there fighting it , not for us, not for islam, but for themselves, for their own country. If you can be effective against the sponsor, it will take minimal support to get them threw it and stable. But you need to choke off the sponsor state and cripple it. While ensuring the purple thumb waving iraqis who celebrated voting dont get slaughtered in the streets.
        Stage 1
        few 'radicals' move in to area in low density, low profile fashion , probably weapons etc also
        stage 2
        seemingly Random attacks, low casualty , high impact attacks playing two racial or ethnic differences, against each other. Highly targeted to galvanize fighting, although it seems random outside. This is the teeter, This is IRaq.
        Stage 3
        Look to Syria.

        January 6, 2014 at 10:25 pm |
      • Random

        The enemy of terrorism is unity. The attacks utilize the differences between people to incite momentum where they need it. Either by the US supporting one group against the other, or within local groups too. They can't fight the US and Russia. They can't even fight one at a time without interference from the other. All attacks are simply meant to divide large united groups apart. So they can be conquered.

        Work. Together.

        January 6, 2014 at 10:35 pm |
      • Random

        You might be able to achieve something with drone support to them. You probably will need to help them stop the influx of new fighters, perhaps an electronic net around iraq. If you do that , while enabling them to kill the militants this won't take long to quash and will take away momentum from syria.
        This is the take away. It is a global jihad. spread them thin and slaughter them on multiple fronts at once. Its all the same fighters fighting everywhere. Don't allow everyone fighting them to have to fight their 'seal team' equivalent. Stop movement from one front to another. Then allow the locals to wipe them out.

        January 7, 2014 at 8:56 am |
  7. George patton

    Now since the "genie's out of the bottle" so to speak, the only logic solution to this mess is just to simply divide Iraq into three different states by first ceding the north to the Kurds, the south to the Shiites and the west to the Sunnis. The problem here is that nobody seems to have the sense to see that and therein lies the tragedy of this!!!

    January 6, 2014 at 8:31 pm | Reply

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