U.S., Chinese warships come dangerously close
The guided missile cruiser USS Cowpens steams through the Philippine Sea on Nov. 10, 2012.
December 13th, 2013
03:25 PM ET

U.S., Chinese warships come dangerously close

By Barbara Starr

A confrontation between the U.S. and Chinese navies led to a tense moment in the South China Sea, CNN has learned.

The incident last Friday, which was resolved peacefully, was the latest sign of Chinese military aggression in international waters and airspace.

A U.S. Navy warship was forced to come to a sudden stop when a Chinese military ship crossed dangerously close in what sources described as a deliberate maneuver.

No weapons were fired and the incident was resolved.
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Reports: American who went missing in Iran worked for CIA
Daniel Levinson (L) shows a picture of his father, ex-FBI agent Robert Levinson, holding his grandson Ryan during a press conference with his mother Christine at the Swiss embassy in Tehran, 22 December 2007.
December 13th, 2013
09:02 AM ET

Reports: American who went missing in Iran worked for CIA

By Susan Candiotti and Catherine E. Shoichet

A former FBI agent who went missing in Iran was working for the CIA there, not conducting private business as officials have previously claimed, The Associated Press and the Washington Post reported on Thursday.

Both the State Department and Bob Levinson's family have long denied he was working for the U.S. government when he disappeared on a trip to Iran in 2007.

But Thursday's reports from the Washington Post and the AP claim that Levinson had been on a CIA mission to dig up information.

A source who's involved in the matter told CNN that there's proof that Levinson worked for the CIA undercover and under contract while also working as a private investigator.

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Filed under: CIA • Iran • Security Brief
Uncertainty after North Korea announces execution of leader's uncle
This file picture taken by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on April 15, 2013 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (R) applauding at the Unhasu orchestra concert at the People's Theatre in Pyongyang to celebrate the 101st anniversary of the birth of late leader Kim Il-Sung, as his uncle, Jang Song-Thaek (L), looks on.
December 13th, 2013
08:50 AM ET

Uncertainty after North Korea announces execution of leader's uncle

By Jethro Mullen and Tom Watkins

As the shock sinks in of North Korea's extraordinary announcement of the execution of leader Kim Jong Un's uncle and former protector, government officials and analysts are trying to decipher what the brutal move means.

The ruthless disposal of Jang Song Thaek - Kim's uncle by marriage who had, until recently, been regarded as the second-most powerful figure in the secretive, nuclear-armed nation - has serious implications for North Korea, its neighbors and the United States, observers said.

But exactly what is going on inside the notoriously opaque North Korea regime remains as murky as ever.

"We don't have a clear sense of this at all," said Victor Cha, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies who represented the United States in nuclear talks with North Korea.

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Filed under: Kim Jong-un • North Korea