November 8th, 2013
01:45 PM ET

'We were wrong': CBS's Lara Logan apologizes for Benghazi report

By David Simpson

CBS correspondent Lara Logan apologized Friday and said the network was "wrong" for a "60 Minutes" report that raised questions about the Obama administration's response to last year's attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. The assault left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

"In this case, we were wrong. We made a mistake," she said on "CBS This Morning." "That's disappointing for any journalist. It's very disappointing for me."

A primary source for the "60 Minutes" report on October 27 was a security contractor using the pseudonym "Morgan Jones," later identified as Dylan Davies. Davies told CBS he was able to reach the Benghazi compound on the night of September 11, 2012, scale a wall and even fight off a militant.

That story cast doubt on whether the Obama administration sent all possible help to try to save Stevens and his three colleagues. The "60 Minutes" story was cited by congressional Republicans who have demanded to know why a military rescue was not attempted.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Benghazi
soundoff (9 Responses)
  1. Melissa

    Wait... let me get this right. First Lara Logan is overseas-Afghanistan...gets pregnant by a married army officer over there then later, accuses a "mob" in India or somewhere of inappropriate touching and she feared for her life which we find out it was a lie per her cameraman and now somebody lies to her about a news story and she feels victimized? That's hilarious. Dan Rather was fired for something like this... she needs to go too. When I see her on the news, I switch stations.

    November 13, 2013 at 2:44 pm | Reply
  2. Random

    No matter how you hash it, or what media you force to recant.... The facts available to us don't change.
    The administration sat on its hands and told us it was because of a movie. That was utter bs. Obama and clinton lied. Seemingly they lied while being fully aware they were.
    Really this isnt a huge deal. Maybe they didnt know till a day later, if so they shouldnt be doing the job, the only way to have delt with this was to be honest. That didnt seem to happen. No matter what kind of bun brusing you give the media your actions are still transparent. I expect the news to mess up. I dont expect the president to bs me. At some point all you can do is own up for it, or you will lose elections based on not owning up for making a bad call.

    November 12, 2013 at 10:25 am | Reply
  3. Admiral Ackbar

    Lara, It's a Trap!

    November 11, 2013 at 11:17 pm | Reply
  4. d

    And the administration is hoping this mea culpa about the event is a bigger story than the event itself.

    November 10, 2013 at 12:15 am | Reply
  5. Realpolitech

    She should have switched outfits. What she wore during the retraction should have been worn during the 60 minutes interview. That way no one would have remembered the apology.

    November 9, 2013 at 10:11 pm | Reply
  6. StanCalif

    Surprise! Today we don't have real journalists, only "headline creators". This leads to so much misinformation reported as truth! All that matters in our media today is getting "eyeballs" and selling ads! Our "free press" is free to say anything, truthful or not! We all suffer from this!
    Our "free press" is supposed to be our protection from lying politicians, who seem to get better and better at telling lies since the press swallows everything they say without question! What is being taught in journalism classes today? Your employers profits are more important than keeping your mouths shut until to know the "facts"?

    November 9, 2013 at 11:57 am | Reply
  7. straighttalk

    Well, journalists who make mistakes should take responsibility and step down. Good by Lara Logan.

    November 9, 2013 at 5:38 am | Reply
  8. itwasthebestoftimes

    Mr. Morgan better get a Fresnell lens prescription, ASAP.

    November 9, 2013 at 2:20 am | Reply

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.