Opinion: U.S. can't force democracy on Egypt
August 20th, 2013
03:02 PM ET

Opinion: U.S. can't force democracy on Egypt

By Anthony H. Cordesman, Special to CNN

Editor's note: Anthony H. Cordesman holds the Arleigh A. Burke Chair in Strategy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Follow CSIS on Twitter.

(CNN) - There are no good or easy solutions for U.S. policy toward Egypt, and short-sighted arguments about military aid miss the broader issues entirely. America is relearning the lesson of the 1950s post-colonial period: Democracy depends on stable and experienced political parties and leaders, a willingness to compromise rather than conspire and to share or give up power until the next election.

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Filed under: Egypt • Muslim Brotherhood • Security Brief
Official: U.S. temporarily holds up some military aid to Egypt
August 20th, 2013
08:44 AM ET

Official: U.S. temporarily holds up some military aid to Egypt

By Jessica Yellin

The Obama administration is withholding some military aid to Egypt as it reviews how it wants to proceed, a U.S. official told CNN.

The move is being described as a "reprogramming" of some funds to Egypt, but in effect, Washington is temporarily holding up some military aid to that country as it prepares for the possibility that future aid could be cut, the official said.

A spokesman for Sen. Patrick Leahy, David Carle, confirmed to CNN Monday that his office has been told the aid has been halted. Leahy, a Vermont Democrat, is chairman of the Appropriations State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee.

The United States gives about $1.23 billion in military aid to Egypt.

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Filed under: Egypt
4 U.S. State employees face reassignment
The U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya following an attack on September 11, 2012
August 20th, 2013
08:35 AM ET

4 U.S. State employees face reassignment

By Jill Dougherty

Four State Department workers who were put on leave after last year's attack on a U.S. mission in Libya will be allowed to resume work, but in different positions, a senior State Department official told CNN on Tuesday.

News of the move irked U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa, one of the Republicans who've pressed the State Department to punish employees for what the lawmakers say were ignored security warnings in advance of the September attack on the Benghazi mission, which left Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans dead.

"Instead of accountability, the State Department offered a charade that included false reports of firings and resignations and now ends in a game of musical chairs where no one misses a single day on the State Department payroll," Issa, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, said Tuesday.

"The Oversight Committee will expand its investigation of the Benghazi terrorist attack to include how a supposed 'Accountability Review Board' investigation resulted in a decision by Secretary Kerry not to pursue any accountability from anyone," Issa added.

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