Snowden claims political persecution amid confusion over asylum requests
July 1st, 2013
10:04 PM ET

Snowden claims political persecution amid confusion over asylum requests

By Jill Dougherty

Edward Snowden spoke out for the first time since fleeing to Moscow, according to a statement attributed to him that was released by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.

In it, he  attacked President Barack Obama and vowed to continue leaking information on government collection of data.

“This kind of deception from a world leader is not justice, and neither is the extralegal penalty of exile,” Snowden said, referring to Obama. “These are the old, bad tools of political aggression. Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me.”

The U.S. government, he claimed, is “using citizenship as a weapon,” revoking his passport and, he claimed, “leaving me a stateless person.”

The State Department says Snowden is not stateless, noting that he is still a U.S. citizen even though his passport has been revoked.

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On the run, Snowden 'unbowed in my convictions'
July 1st, 2013
07:00 PM ET

On the run, Snowden 'unbowed in my convictions'

By Matt Smith

The anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks released a statement attributed to NSA leaker Edward Snowden on Monday, blasting the Obama administration for trying to block his efforts to seek asylum in another country.

"Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me," Snowden said in the statement issued through WikiLeaks, which has been assisting his effort to find a haven from U.S. espionage charges.

He added, "I am unbowed in my convictions and impressed at the efforts taken by so many."

Snowden had sought asylum in Ecuador after revealing details of secret U.S. surveillance programs to reporters. He flew to Moscow from Hong Kong on June 23 after the United States requested his extradition, and there were conflicting reports Monday about whether he was now seeking asylum in Russia.

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Filed under: Edward Snowden • Intelligence • NSA • WikiLeaks
July 1st, 2013
01:12 PM ET

George W. Bush: Snowden damaged U.S.

Former President George W. Bush tells CNN's Robyn Curnow that security programs he put in place protect civil liberties.

"I put that program in place to protect the country," former President George W. Bush said. "One of the certainties was that civil liberties were guaranteed. ... I think there needs to be a balance and as the President explained there is a proper balance."


Filed under: Edward Snowden • Intelligence
July 1st, 2013
01:02 PM ET

Cheat sheet: Catching up on Snowden and the latest NSA leaks

By Catherine E. Shoichet

Fresh reports of global espionage. Furious European officials. A plea from the vice president.

The weekend was packed with twists and turns in the case of former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden and the secret documents he's leaked.

Snowden, who faces espionage charges in the United States, is still in Russia and seeking asylum from Ecuador.

Here are some key recent developments that CNN is reporting.

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Filed under: Edward Snowden • Intelligence • NSA • Russia