Source: Justice Dept. investigates former vice chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff
June 27th, 2013
10:11 PM ET

Source: Justice Dept. investigates former vice chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff

By Barbara Starr

The former vice chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff is under investigation by the Justice Department regarding material in a book by David Sanger, a correspondent for The New York Times, a source directly familiar with the situation said Thursday.

The source could not confirm that the investigation involving Retired Marine Gen. James Cartwright is specifically about the Stuxnet computer virus, which Sanger writes about in his 2013 book "Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power."

NBC News reported Thursday, citing legal sources, that Cartwright has been told he's under investigation for allegedly leaking classified information about Stuxnet, a complex virus that infected computers in Iranian nuclear facilities in 2010.

That leak was one of a series of national security-related leaks last year and had details of how the United States and Israel were behind the Stuxnet attack.

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June 27th, 2013
03:25 PM ET

Airport stakeout: Hunting Snowden

By Jim Boulden, reporting from Sheremetyevo International Airport

My first morning at Moscow Airport's Terminal E consisted of an indescribable burger at Burger King. We are thinking of going to one of two TGI Friday's for dinner in Terminal D.

There is always Costa Coffee for tomorrow morning if I want to walk the half mile or so from my pod hotel room.

I'm on day two of my time inside Moscow's international transfer terminals. They are long, clean, stuffed with shops and not stuffed with very many people.

The person I have come to look for is Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency computer contractor who spilled details of U.S. surveillance programs to reporters.

Editor's note: CNN correspondent Jim Boulden joins the hunt for the NSA leaker Edward Snowden, taking over from CNN's John Defterios inside Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport where the man the NSA can't find is widely believed to be staying.

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Filed under: Edward Snowden • Russia
As Snowden seeks asylum, U.S. bides its time
June 27th, 2013
07:08 AM ET

As Snowden seeks asylum, U.S. bides its time

By Elise Labott and Matt Smith

The United States is biding its time in its effort to get fugitive leaker Edward Snowden delivered to its custody, hoping that Russia wearies of him and Ecuador decides against granting him asylum, senior U.S. officials said Wednesday.

Snowden, the former National Security Agency computer contractor who exposed details of U.S. surveillance programs, faces espionage charges if shipped back home. He is currently cooling his heels at Moscow's international airport, where he arrived Sunday from Hong Kong.

"Time is our friend," one senior administration official told CNN. "The Russians now just want him gone, and I'm not sure if they care at this point if he goes to a country that might be inclined to send him back."

The State Department revoked Snowden's passport after charges were brought last week. Officials in Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous Chinese territory, said it needed more information before it could act on a U.S. request to hold him there. WikiLeaks said Snowden flew out of Hong Kong on refugee papers issued by Ecuador, where he has requested asylum, but Ecuador's deputy foreign minister said Wednesday that his country had provided him no documents.