Pentagon says China using cyberattacks
May 7th, 2013
05:34 AM ET

Pentagon says China using cyberattacks

By CNNMoney's Charles Riley

The Pentagon has accused China of trying to extract sensitive information from U.S. government computers, the latest in a series of rhetorical skirmishes between the two countries on the issue of cyberattacks.

The frank assessment, made in an annual report to U.S. lawmakers on Chinese military capabilities, is the harshest and most detailed set of accusations made thus far by the Obama administration.

"In 2012, numerous computer systems around the world, including those owned by the U.S. government, continued to be targeted for intrusions, some of which appear to be attributable directly to the Chinese government and military," the report said.

The Pentagon said China is carrying out the attacks in an effort to extract information from "diplomatic, economic and defense industrial base sectors that support U.S. national defense programs." The intellectual property and data is likely being used to bolster China's own defense and high tech industries, the report said

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: China • Cybersecurity • Pentagon
soundoff (13 Responses)
  1. ProtectAmericanJobs

    While our politicians have been bickering for years like idiotic fools, China has been crushing the USA in a war that we don't even know we're in and without even firing a shot.

    Bringing manufacturing back home to the USA is going to end up being not only a key to restoring our economy, but to maintaining our national security as well.

    •Chinese firms and state agencies have been implicated in a host of hacking attacks, on targets ranging from leading industrial and technology firms, to the Pentagon and other US government agencies, to the New York Times, Coca-Cola and numerous other companies and industries.

    •Oct 2012: The U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee said U.S. telecommunications operators should not be allowed do business with China's top network equipment makers because potential Chinese state influence on the companies poses a security threat.

    •Also most counterfeit goods are produced and manufactured in China, making it the counterfeit capital of the world. In fact, the counterfeiting industry accounts for 8% of China's GDP.

    •Foreign Lobbyists here in the US promote sending US jobs to countries like China, where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. It also doesn't help us compete when these company's factories are subsidized by China's communist government. Just check out the current Chinese extreme pollution issues – We all live in the same world, but not every country plays by the same rules.

    May 28, 2013 at 4:54 pm | Reply
  2. Pete

    What's funny with all this tech stuff being stolen by China they're still decades behind us because of our ever changing ,advancements in that technology and basicly they can't keep up...And remember you're only as good as your supporting cast and if China keeps using basic slave labor nothing for them is going to change but the air pollution that keeps getting worse for them and quess what they don't care about that either do they!!

    May 7, 2013 at 11:09 am | Reply
    • Marine5484

      Wrong, Pete. The reason that the Chinese are decades behind us is the simple fact that these claims that China is "stealing" technology from us is just a bunch of right-wing bla-bla-bla without a word of truth in it! The same phony claims were made against Russia too back in the 1950's and '60's.

      May 7, 2013 at 5:14 pm | Reply
      • Jomama

        I believe your both correct, stolen at first and then improved on.This is the 3rd war.Wouldnt it be easier and cheaper to break into a system and disrupt a population than to occupy and get pretty much the same results?

        May 8, 2013 at 3:41 am |
      • Jomama

        You got these computer geeks disrupting computers around the world because they are bored.Now its a different ballgame.We have become a slave to technology,say you wish to attack a populated area,dissrupt everything,I wont go into all the stuff that can be done but here is a basic example very basic but true.A local convenience store computer goes down, food and gas doesn't move at all!.Now apply this to anythingyou can imagine that has a computer and to any program.WW3 has started yrs ago and all these cyber attacks are just basic drills to test and probe to find vulnerable areas.

        May 8, 2013 at 4:20 am |
      • Pete

        @marine5484,its varifiable facts that tech info has been stolen just recently by the Chinese in California by the FBI...And like I said you can't have unprofessional slave labor doing technical work like computer chip manufacturing like in Intel and AMD,its more involved than that...

        May 8, 2013 at 11:55 am |
    • blah1

      How do we know anything outside the public arena???
      Lockheed had the SR-71 under testing during the late 50's (that can be somewhat verified).
      To say in the acceleration curve we have a clue about China's equiv to area 51 is not only stupid but dangerous.

      May 20, 2013 at 12:02 am | Reply
  3. BigShiz

    We already spent more than a trillion bucks on the f35 program,and China stole the Tec and is reproducing it for a fraction of the cost.

    May 7, 2013 at 10:42 am | Reply
  4. Hahahahahahha

    I knew my computer had a chink in it!!! Hahahahaahahhah

    May 7, 2013 at 9:24 am | Reply
  5. StanCalif

    This is news??? Haven't we heard this repeatedly for several years now? Just imagine what we are not being told!
    "Experts" have warned for years that our computer systems are extremely vulnerable, yet nothing changes!

    May 7, 2013 at 6:07 am | Reply
    • Marine5484

      One thing that the right-wing news media conveniently forgets to mention here Stan, is the fact that we've been attacking both Russia and China through cyberspace for years on end, proving just how much the M.I.C. controls the press!

      May 7, 2013 at 5:18 pm | Reply

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.