U.S. may remove all troops from Afghanistan after 2014
A cloud of dust rises from an Afghan road after US troops destroy an IED in their path. (Getty Images photo)
January 8th, 2013
07:54 PM ET

U.S. may remove all troops from Afghanistan after 2014

By Mike Mount

The Obama administration is considering the possibility of removing all U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the NATO combat mission officially finishes at the end of 2014, White House officials said Tuesday.

The comments by Ben Rhodes, the White House's deputy national security adviser, come as the Pentagon and White House mull over the number of troops that could be left in Afghanistan after 2014 to fight insurgents and train Afghan security forces.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai and President Obama are scheduled to meet on Friday in Washington.

Rhodes said the administration is considering a range of options, with one scenario having no U.S. troops there. The range, according to defense officials, had until recently been between 6,000 to 15,000 U.S. troops possibly remaining in the country, based on an assessment by the U.S. top commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen.

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Karzai • Military
January 8th, 2013
06:37 PM ET

What is a Google exec doing in North Korea?

It is a rare sight indeed in one of the most isolated countries on Earth – Google Chairman Eric Schmidt visiting a computer lab at a university in North Korea. Schmidt is making the trip to the impoverished country with former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson. Could a change in the country's direction under new leader Kim Jong-un be on the horizon? Jill Dougherty reports.


Filed under: North Korea
January 8th, 2013
05:25 PM ET

Obama's CIA Pick & Movie Torture Controversy

Torture allegations in 2008 derailed CIA director nominee John Brennan from getting the same job four years ago. Now as Brennan prepares for his confirmation hearing the movie Zero Dark Thirty opens nationwide and the issue of "enhanced interrogation" techniques are front and center again. CNN's Chris Lawrence reports on the controversy.

Freed Tunisian still a Benghazi suspect
January 8th, 2013
03:09 PM ET

Freed Tunisian still a Benghazi suspect

By Susan Candiotti

The  Tunisian man  held in connection with the Benghazi diplomatic mission attack remains a suspect despite being freed from detention in Tunis, according to a U.S. law enforcement official with direct knowledge of the Libya investigation.

The fact that he's been freed from detention 'doesn't mean he's any less a suspect," the official said.

The source added that Ali Harzi does not appear on the security video recovered from the  Benghazi compound.

Investigators have identified at least 15 individuals that  "we're taking a serious look at," the official told CNN, explaining that some of those being scrutinized were identified on the compound video but others were not present at the scene.

The source said that ultimately, "people will be indicted [in connection with the consulate attack]; we will get indictments but it's not possible to put a timetable on it."

Read more on the story here

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Filed under: Benghazi • Libya • Tunisia
Senator threatens to hold up Brennan nomination
January 8th, 2013
01:37 PM ET

Senator threatens to hold up Brennan nomination

Saying he has "not forgotten about the Benghazi debacle," Sen. Lindsey Graham called for a delay in the confirmation process of John Brennan, the president's choice for CIA director, as investigations still continue surrounding the September 11, 2012 U.S. consulate attack in Libya.

"I do not believe we should confirm anyone as Director of the CIA until our questions are answered," Graham said in a statement.

The Republican senator from South Carolina has helped lead congressional efforts to address the deadly attack in Libya. He was one of several Republican senators who sharply questioned U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice and her role in the aftermath of the violence.

Days after the incident, Rice appeared on television news shows and described on the violence as a spontaneous attack spurred by outrage over an anti-Islam film. The intelligence community, however, later called it a terrorist attack.

Rice used unclassified talking points from the intelligence community in her television appearances, which apparently went through multiple drafts before landing in her hands. In briefings to Congress, intelligence officials said the initial draft was more specific in linking individuals to 'al Qaeda.' But when the document was sent to the rest of the intelligence community for review, there was a decision to change 'al Qaeda' to a broader term of 'extremists' for the final version.

Read the story on CNN's Political Ticker


Filed under: Benghazi • Brennan • Central Intelligence Agency • Congress • Graham • Intelligence • Libya
Out - but not in: Military club closes ranks to gay wife
Ashley Broadway, left, and her wife, Lt. Col. Heather Mack. Broadway says a Fort Bragg spouse club rejected her.
January 8th, 2013
10:54 AM ET

Out - but not in: Military club closes ranks to gay wife

A gay member of the military and her spouse's experience may reflect a struggle at the nation's military bases to adapt culturally to the legal changes brought on by 2011's repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.

Though gay people can now serve openly, the military doesn't formally recognize same-sex marriage under the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a law passed in 1996 that denies many benefits to same-sex spouses. One of those benefits is military IDs.

 

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Filed under: DADT
January 8th, 2013
12:15 AM ET

Analysis: Study shows rise of al Qaeda affiliate in Syria

By Nic Robertson and Paul Cruickshank

A jihadist group with links to al Qaeda has become the most effective of the different factions fighting the regime, according to a new analysis, and now has some 5,000 fighters.

The group is Jabhat al-Nusra, which was designated an al Qaeda affiliate by the United States government last month. It is led by veterans of the Iraqi insurgency "and has shown itself to be the principal force against Assad and the Shabiha," according to the study.

CNN obtained an advance copy of the analysis, set to be released Tuesday by the Quilliam Foundation, a counterterrorism policy institute based in London.

"The civil war in Syria is a gift from the sky for al-Nusra; they are coasting off its energy," the lead author of the report, Noman Benotman, told CNN.

Benotman, a former prominent Libyan Jihadist who was personally acquainted with al Qaeda's top leaders including Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri, consulted Western and regional intelligence officials as well as jihadists in Syria, including "al-Nusra sources."

And at a time of optimism that the global threat from al Qaeda terrorism has crested, the study will fuel anxiety in Western capitals that a powerful al Qaeda affiliate may become entrenched in the heart of the Arab world, creating deep challenges in any post- al-Assad Syria, and a new threat to international security.

What's next for Syria in 2013?

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Syria
With Afghan president's visit, nations' post-2014 future takes shape
January 8th, 2013
12:00 AM ET

With Afghan president's visit, nations' post-2014 future takes shape

By Mike Mount

The Obama administration's plan to solidify the number of U.S. troops that will be left in Afghanistan after the NATO-led operations end in 2014 should come into greater focus this week as Afghan President Hamid Karzai visits Washington.

With conversations scheduled at the State Department on Wednesday, the Pentagon on Thursday and the White House on Friday, Karzai should get a better sense of how the United States plans to maintain the relationship with his nation in the future.

At the Pentagon, Karzai will be briefed on the plans to keep thousands of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to fight insurgents and to continue to train Afghan Security Forces.

But that plan hinges on what Karzai may want from the United States, according to Defense officials. It's no secret that Karzai wants total Afghan control of detention operations, meaning all Afghans being held by the United States and NATO allies would be turned over to Afghan authorities immediately.

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Karzai • NATO