Extremist triangle a growing threat to Africa and America
An apparent car bomb outside a Catholic church in the central Nigerian city of Jos on Sunday, March 11, 2012 left six people dead. The blast was blamed on the Islamic militant group called Boko Haram, considered by Gen. Carter Ham as one of the three most violent groups in all of Africa.
June 25th, 2012
05:36 PM ET

Extremist triangle a growing threat to Africa and America

By Larry Shaughnessy
CNN Pentagon Producer

The man in charge of U.S. Africa Command calls growing cooperation between "the three most violent" Islamic extremists groups in Africa a concern for Africa and America.

Gen. Carter Ham, USAFRICOM commander, spoke Monday to a meeting of the Africa Center for Strategic Studies.
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Filed under: Africa • Libya • Nigeria • Security Brief • Somalia • US Africa Command
Pentagon ordered to preserve materials related to leak investigation
Pentagon ordered not to shred leak documents. (CNN Photo)
June 25th, 2012
03:59 PM ET

Pentagon ordered to preserve materials related to leak investigation

 By Barbara Starr

CNN Pentagon Correspondent

Defense Department officials are under a Justice Department order to preserve all e-mails and documents that may be related to the ongoing investigation into leaks to the news media of national security information, a senior Pentagon official confirmed Monday.

"We are complying with the preservation order," the official told CNN.

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FIRST ON CNN: Intel chief rolls out new measures aimed at plugging leaks
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper
June 25th, 2012
10:34 AM ET

FIRST ON CNN: Intel chief rolls out new measures aimed at plugging leaks

By Suzanne Kelly

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is rolling out new measures Monday aimed at ending what recently has been a spate of leaks regarding classified programs and operations.

Among Clapper's recommendations, to be instituted across the 16 intelligence agencies, are an enhanced counterintelligence polygraph test for employees who have access to classified information, and the establishment of a task force of intelligence community inspectors general that will have the ability to conduct independent investigations across agencies in coordination with the Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive.

Clapper has also called for a review of current policies that relate to interaction with members of the media, and how that interaction must be reported.

The new question that will be added to the current counterintelligence polygraph test - which intelligence community employees who handle classified information are required to take - will specifically ask whether the employee has disclosed classified information to a member of the media.

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FIRST ON CNN: Director of national intelligence expected to roll out new measures against leaks
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper
June 25th, 2012
02:00 AM ET

FIRST ON CNN: Director of national intelligence expected to roll out new measures against leaks

By Suzanne Kelly

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is expected to roll out new measures aimed at ending leaks of classified information after a spate of recent leaks.

Those leaks affected an ongoing intelligence operation against the al Qaeda arm in Yemen back in May, and included recent disclosures about the classified drone program and a cyber warfare program known as Stuxnet, aimed at an Iranian nuclear enrichment facility.

A source tells CNN that Clapper believes the source of such leaks span multiple government agencies, departments and branches of government.

While the new measures are expected to apply only to the intelligence community that Clapper oversees, they are not expected to apply to members of the National Security Council, who advise the president on sensitive and classified programs.

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June 25th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Can Turkey force U.S. and other NATO countries to attack Syria?

By Adam Levine, CNN

Turkey's leadership took on a much more strident tone on Sunday, calling the downing of its military jet by Syria an "act of aggression" and invoking its right to consult with other NATO nations. That call to meet has raised the question of whether other nations, including the United States, would be compelled to strike back on Turkey's behalf.

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu has spoken with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the foreign ministers of the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Russia and Iran, and European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton since the incident, spokesman Selcuk Unal told CNN Saturday.

British Foreign Minister William Hague Sunday called the incident "outrageous" and said he condemned it wholeheartedly."

"The Assad regime should not make the mistake of believing that it can act with impunity. It will be held to account for its behavior," Hague said of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

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Filed under: Middle East • Military • NATO • Syria • Turkey