Karzai blames attacks on "intelligence failure"
April 16th, 2012
05:28 PM ET

Karzai blames attacks on "intelligence failure"

By Adam Levine

Afghanistan's president said the attacks this weekend in his country represent a "serious intelligence failure" by NATO and other allies.

President Hamid Karzai made the comment about the coordinated attacks in Kabul and other parts of Afghanistan in an interview with Christiane Amanpour during the premiere of her new CNN International program, “Amanpour."

"This is indicative, ma'am, of serious intelligence failure, especially an intelligence failure of our allies in NATO and others, because of the equipment that they have, because of the resources that they have, because of the time that they've spent in this part of the world," Karzai said in the interview, which aired Monday.

Asked if he was blaming NATO for the attacks, Karzai said he was not, but was "simply asking a question as to the efficiency of our intelligence gathering systems. Whether these systems are working all right."

The United States had intelligence that a big attack was planned by the Haqqani network, U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said Monday.

"We had received a great deal of intelligence indicating that the Haqqanis were planning these kinds of attacks," Panetta told reporters during a news conference.

The intelligence was "vague" regarding timing, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said at the same press conference.

"There was intelligence suggesting that, as the winter became the spring, and the fighting season reopened, on or about the 21st of March, you know, the beginning of the new year in some societies, that the Taliban wanted to make a statement that they were back. And so, I mean, that was kind of one thread," Gen. Martin Dempsey said. "Then the other thread was that the simultaneity of attacks across the country would, in their view, have … kind of attenuator, actually accent that. But there was no specificity regarding location or time."

Dempsey said the information the United States has so far doesn’t show that the plot originated in Pakistan.

"The Haqqani network exists on both sides of the border, so we're not prepared to suggest this emanated out of Pakistan," Dempsey said. "I mean, the evidence may at some point lead us there, but we're not there yet."

Panetta rebuffed the suggestion the attacks call into question capabilities of the Afghan security forces.

"There were no tactical gains here,” he said. “These are isolated attacks that are done for symbolic purposes, and they have not regained any territory. They haven't been able to really conduct an organized attack since last year."

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Filed under: Afghanistan • ISAF • Kabul • Karzai • Military
soundoff (34 Responses)
  1. news article

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    February 7, 2013 at 4:26 am | Reply
  2. Maurice

    Hi Kellie.The photo: Afghan police trinaees. They're obviously Hazaras.I believe it was from either an Afghan government, ISAF or Canadian military or CIDA site.Comrade the Plump:"Thus a fraudulent result stands." Well, no. The result that stands is the result that was determined after the fraudulent votes were estimated and deducted from the initial and bogus IEC tally. This still left Karzai with 49 point something percent, and Abdullah way behind. It is a peculiarity of the Afghan system that a 50 per cent vote threshold is required to hold office. The runoff did not occur only because the second contender dropped out, and given the terrors a second round posed, this may not be altogether a bad thing in itself.A British or Canadian requirement of 50 per cent would mean maybe a handful of Canadian MPs would rightfully hold their seats, and if I'm not mistaken, not a single British MP won with a majority of constituents' votes. I don't mean to be nitpicky, but I know of no analysis or conjecture that puts Karzai's vote below (or even close to) Abdullah's, and there were other strong candidates, too (Bashardosht, Ghani, etc.) Karzai left them all in the dust. All else you say is an important insight, especially the observation that democracy needs good soil in which to root, and it's terribly fragile even then, and also: "Thus we have a war on several fronts." I don't know that I've ever even referred to the "war" in Afghanistan, come to think of it, partly because it isn't a war in any conventional sense of the term at all. It is certainly fair to say it is "war on several fronts," because it is a liberation struggle, a people's war, a sort of class war, and a war against slavery and misogyny and obscurantism, as you observe. As for the electoral fraud, that "they have just learn that they can get away with it" I don't think is quite right. You could also make the case that there are not a few Afghans of the Tammany Hall school who have learned from this experience that electoral fraud is actually not something you can get away with, that you will be caught in the attempt, and the whole world will be watching your every move."I am concerned about a too easy acceptance of Karzai's re-election, especially in the light of the continuing UK press consensus of the need for a sell out – sorry, negotiated settlement giving power to moderate Taliban, warlords and kleptocrats, whilst saying 'bugger off and suffer' to the people."This is my concern, too. What you describe is also more or less the Canadian consensus, and most worrying, it is a significant school of thought in Amerikay, and there is little in the way of a progressive, popular commitment to the Afghan people and their struggle that should be expected to apply the brakes to a sellout.How I wish it had been a clear and unambiguous win for an Afghan candidate that convincingly promised the same sort of hope and change that we associate with Obama's victory. But that was not to be. So, there is little for Afghanistan's friends abroad to do but pick themselves up, dust themselves off, spit on their hands and get back to work.Allons-y.Affectionately,t

    May 23, 2012 at 10:07 pm | Reply
  3. whybs

    When you blame someone else, you are not in charge. Get rid of Karzai.

    May 13, 2012 at 10:58 am | Reply
  4. Edwardo

    It seems Karzai is totally set on blaming everyone except afghan intelligence for the attacks. He states that his forces are ready to handle the security of Afghanistan. Well I hope so, but I think not, because if American or NATO forces had not been around, it could have gone very different. When American troops finally withdraw and They will someday, that will be the test of how good Afghan security forces can protect Afghanistan. I just hope someday Afghanistan will show its gratitude for America being there and doing what it did for Afghanistan. I hope We never have to go in full force into Afghanistan again, but then it will depend on Karzai's leadership and His security forces performance.

    April 20, 2012 at 4:35 pm | Reply
  5. gelbkreuz

    He is blaming the people he says he wants out of his country – for the attacks perpetrated by his own countrymen. I wonder for how long he'll say that after NATO leaves him high and dry starting next year. Probably, he'll say its NATO's fault for the next 20 odd years – that is if his administration survives after 2013...

    April 17, 2012 at 1:14 pm | Reply
  6. shivadass

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    April 17, 2012 at 12:48 am | Reply
  7. Capt. Obvious

    That's it! feed the sonuvabitch to the Taliban!, Fucker needs to learn how it is to have to pay and run your country alone. He wouldn't last a week without us

    April 16, 2012 at 9:51 pm | Reply
  8. Rick

    Karzai has done everything he can to mussle american intelligence and now reaps the rewards. He deserves full blame for Afganistan security force failrues. Not long ago he was demanding the US to leave. Well, adios.

    April 16, 2012 at 8:07 pm | Reply
    • Osiris

      Karzai is an American puppet, the blame is ours, and ours alone.

      April 16, 2012 at 9:19 pm | Reply
      • Snoot

        Thank you.

        April 17, 2012 at 11:48 am |
      • trooollll

        since when bitch!!!!!

        April 17, 2012 at 3:13 pm |
      • They are Crooks

        Karzi is a con man.

        April 19, 2012 at 9:27 am |
      • James

        This is one of the most unintelligent comments that I've read here. It's highly unlikely that you've been here and seen what goes on on the ground. I've been here for eleven months and will be here for eleven more. Most of the comments you read are that the ANSF are fully prepared to take control of their own country but they are categorically denying any responsibility in this most recent attack. We won't be here forever to wipe their noses. When we leave – so will most of the millionaires that we've made in the past 11 years.

        ANSF – what a joke.

        April 19, 2012 at 10:00 am |
  9. INTEL SPELL

    the thing is a playing field for all nations and types , in layman terms its a lame game of blame.

    CORRUPTION IS OFF THE CHARTS !

    April 16, 2012 at 6:20 pm | Reply

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