Senate panel passes controversial detainee provisions
November 15th, 2011
09:50 PM ET

Senate panel passes controversial detainee provisions

By Adam Levine

A controversial provision to require the military to retain custody of terror suspects affiliated with Al Qaeda, Taliban or allied groups has been approved by the Senate Armed Services Committee and will be voted on by the Senate.

The provision mandates that the military hold those captured attacking or planning to attack the U.S. or allies, even if captured in the United States. It does not apply to U.S. citizens.

In addition, the bill would not allow the transfer of Guantanamo detainees to any country where there was a "confirmed case" of a released Guantanamo detainee who "subsequently engaged in any terrorist activity."

The provisions have held up for months the National Defense Authorization Act for 2012, which outlines spending defense spending priorities. In a compromise reached in committee, several provisions were amended after objection from the Obama administration but still includes military custody for those captured in the US, which the administration objects to.

The committee agreement drew immediate criticism from the chairwoman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and the chairman of the Senate Justice committee, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT).

“We have long supported providing the administration with the flexibility to address terrorism cases, including the ability to prosecute terrorists in federal criminal courts. Regrettably, the so-called ‘agreement’ reached today in the Senate Armed Services Committee will only harm the efforts of intelligence and law enforcement officials to bring to justice those who would harm Americans here and abroad," the two committee heads said in an statement.

“The bill reported by the Armed Services Committee today does little to resolve our stated concerns and those of the administration about mandatory military custody, including the potential for this bill to create operational confusion and problems in the field. We have said before that these proposals are unwise, and will harm our national security. That is as true today as it ever has been.

soundoff (4 Responses)
  1. Why don't you cover this?

    http://thenewsunit.blogspot.com/2011/12/national-defense-authorization-act.html

    December 3, 2011 at 10:28 pm | Reply
  2. doesntmatter

    "...the so-called ‘agreement’ reached today in the Senate Armed Services Committee will only harm the efforts of intelligence and law enforcement officials to bring to justice those who would harm Americans here and abroad."

    No. That would be trying the terrorists in criminal court.

    November 16, 2011 at 2:57 pm | Reply

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