Iraq detainee accused of killing U.S. soldiers may go free
November 30th, 2011
07:38 PM ET

Iraq detainee accused of killing U.S. soldiers may go free

By Tim Lister

Ali Mussa Daqduq – a Lebanese militant accused of involvement in the murder of several U.S. soldiers in Iraq – has been in U.S. military detention in Iraq since 2007. But not for much longer. As the last U.S. forces depart Iraq, Daqduq may soon go free, without facing trial.

The Iraqis have given no indication that they will allow Daqduq to be taken out of the country and the case has become a tug-of-war between Iraq and the Obama Administration. The prospect that Daqduq – a veteran operative of the Lebanese Hezbollah militia – may escape U.S. justice altogether has infuriated members of Congress. And even if the Iraqis agree to let him leaves with his captors, just how and where he would face trial is another political minefield for the Justice Department.

Daqduq was accused of organizing a kidnapping in the Iraqi city of Karbala in January 2007 that left five U.S. soldiers dead. After he was captured some months later, according to U.S. intelligence officials, Daqduq pretended to be a deaf-mute. But officials identified him as a 24-year veteran of Hezbollah who had commanded a special operations unit and been sent to Iraq to develop “Special Groups” within Shi’ite militia. They said he admitted working with the Quds Force, a branch of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. U.S. military intelligence contended the Quds force was using Hezbollah as a surrogate in Iraq. FULL POST


Filed under: Hezbollah • Iraq • Military • Quds Force
November 30th, 2011
07:33 PM ET

Is China hiding larger nuclear arsenal underground?

China may be hiding a major secret about its nuclear capability deep underground. But not deep enough to keep a group of American college students from finding it.  But the group's claims that China's arsenal is far bigger than previously believed has some questioning the findings.
CNN Pentagon Correspondent Chris Lawrence has the story.

Congress questions post-war aid to Iraq
November 30th, 2011
07:10 PM ET

Congress questions post-war aid to Iraq

By Charley Keyes

Members of Congress clashed Wednesday over continuing to provide money to Iraq as American troops complete their withdrawal by the end of next month.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-California, portrayed the Iraqis as ungrateful for the American expenditure in lives and treasure.

"We shouldn't spend a day more, a dollar more on their behalf," Rohrabacher said.
FULL POST

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Filed under: Congress • Foreign Aid • Inspector General • Iraq • Pentagon • State Department
November 30th, 2011
07:00 PM ET

Hotel cites national security defense in discrimination suit

The Mandarin Oriental Hotel in DC barred a Muslim employee from serving an Israeli delegation, claiming it had no choice but to comply with a national security mandate from the U.S. government. CNN's Barbara Starr reports.

Embracing Myanmar's promise cautiously
November 30th, 2011
06:28 PM ET

Embracing Myanmar's promise cautiously

By Senior State Department Producer Elise Labott

Much has happened in the year since Aung San Suu Kyi, or "The Lady," as she is referred to in Myanmar, was released after two decades in house arrest.

Once unable to communicate with the people of Myanmar, let alone the outside world, now the Nobel laureate intends to run for parliament.

It's a sign of her resilience but also emblematic of the hope that Myanmar's government is serious about making democratic reforms and moving from five decades of direct military rule.

These openings have prompted increased engagement by the United States and a coveted visit this week by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the first by a U.S. secretary of state in more than 50 years.

Suu Kyi is a bit of an enigma. She is known worldwide for her efforts to bring democracy to Myanmar, also known as Burma, but few people have had the opportunity to hear her speak at any great length over year years. FULL POST

November 30th, 2011
01:12 PM ET

Official: British embassy storming was deliberate provocation

By Adam Levine

A top British official accused elements of Iran's government of being involved in this week's storming of the British embassy buildings in Iran.

In an interview airing on CNN International at 1pET, the British Under-Secretary of State at the Foreign Office Alistair Burt said that the attack was a deliberate provocation.

"The people who were involved are known to have connections with elements of the regime. Again, Iran is a divided, conflicted leadership," Burt said in the interview.

"It is clear that not all parts of leadership were involved. But nothing like that happens in Tehran without leadership being involved in some way."

Burt also noted that the attacks happened in "two separate places simultaneously."

In response to the storming of the compounds, Britain has closed its Tehran embassy and ordered Iran shut its embassy in London.

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Filed under: Iran • UK
Air Hillary over Myanmar
November 30th, 2011
12:05 PM ET

Air Hillary over Myanmar

Our Jill Dougherty snapped this shot of the Uppatasanti Pagoda as the plane carrying Secretary of State Hillary Clinton flew into Myanmar. It is the first visit of an American official to the country in the last five decades.

Read Jill's dispatch about the trip: Clinton trip "tests the waters" in Myanmar

Cyber security bill promotes sharing of threat data
November 30th, 2011
10:14 AM ET

Cyber security bill promotes sharing of threat data

By CNN Sr. National Security Producer Pam Benson

Legislation introduced in the House Intelligence Committee on Wednesday is designed to knock down the barriers that interfere with the federal government and the private sector sharing critical information about cybersecurity threats.

The bill would enable the intelligence community to share classified information with the private sector while at the same time addressing the concerns private companies have with providing information about attacks on their systems to the government.

Communication between the two sides has been problematic and difficult. The government has limited the amount of information it provides private industry about cyberattacks for fear of compromising secrets.

And private industry is often reluctant to report attacks against it. Sean Noonan, a tactical analyst for Stratfor, said business considerations often factor into a company's decision to reveal a cyber intrusion. "If it goes public, they've seen in the past that it could hurt them, hurt their business more and more," Noonan said.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Congress • Cybersecurity • Intelligence
Clinton trip 'tests the waters' in Myanmar
November 30th, 2011
02:09 AM ET

Clinton trip 'tests the waters' in Myanmar

By CNN Foreign Affairs Correspondent Jill Dougherty reporting from Busan, South Korea

You could call this the "show me" trip: the first visit by a secretary of state in more than a half-century to the nation one U.S. official recently referred to as that "mythical and tragic country" of Myanmar.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives in the county Wednesday to start a two-day visit.

The United States still refers to the country as Burma, citing displeasure over how the name was changed when the results of democratic elections were thrown out by the military junta more than 25 years ago.

Ruled by that junta since 1962, Myanmar is now under a new president, a former general elected in March of this year. The country is undergoing a period of rapid political change that the Obama administration cautiously says it finds encouraging as well as promising.

FULL POST


Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Myanmar • Secretary of State
Controversial detainee provision passes senate
November 29th, 2011
05:58 PM ET

Controversial detainee provision passes senate

By Ted Barrett

The Senate Tuesday easily defeated an amendment that would have removed from a defense policy bill new rules for the detention and due process of suspected terrorists.

The bipartisan 61-37 vote was a defeat for the Obama administration, which opposes the proposed changes and has suggested it would veto the bill unless they are removed.

The new rules would require suspected al Qaeda terrorists – even those captured in the U.S. - to be held in military, not civilian, custody.

Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colorado, said if the controversial provisions weren’t stripped from the bill they would “give the military the power to indefinitely detain accused enemy combatants – including Americans captured on U.S. soil.”
FULL POST


Filed under: Afghanistan • Al Qaeda • Congress • Gitmo • Levin • Living With Terror • McCain • Terrorism
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