August 17th, 2011
09:20 AM ET

Riding with Afghanistan's security force

A new report released this week raised fresh doubts about a key aspect of the US strategy in Afghanistan: building the Afghan security force.  In Kabul, CNN's David Ariosto headed out on patrol with members of the force to get a first hand look at the training and patrolling effort.

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Hot Spot Dispatch
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  1. Atlantis Logistics,hazar bölgesi proje hizmetleri,Afganistan lojistik,Ortadoğu lojistik,körfez proje servisi,Afghanistan Logistics,Middle East Logistics,caspian region project services

    blue atlantis logistics, logistics solitions.

    July 5, 2012 at 5:40 am | Reply
  2. Capt Ashley Norris, DCOM-Police

    David,
    Let me extend an invitation to come and speak to members of the DCOM-Police staff and some of our Afghan National Police advisors about the types of training we help provide. Also, to look at the equipment the ANP are training with, currently use and they are slated to receive through March 2012.

    On a daily basis there are approximately 8,500 ANP students in 59 different trainings classes at 32 separate training sites throughout Afghanistan. Approximately 4,100 ANP students graduate monthly.

    We are also putting a large focus on literacy training since 9 out of 10 recruits are illiterate and innumerate. This 100% mandatory program began in 2009 and since then over 121,000 police and soldiers have completed at least a 1st grade literacy level course. This is one of the many steps the ANP is taking to professionalize their force.

    Last month Coalition forces gave $1.15 million worth of tactical gear to the General Directorate of Police Special Unit in Kabul. This equipment (hand grips, infrared aiming lasers and rail-mounted flashlights) will complement the night-vision goggles that they were issued in February. As with all equipment, accountability and stewardship is critical and will be maintained through the Afghan logistics system with Coalition oversight.

    We are working with the ANP to identify and fulfill needs that will enable them to do their job protecting the people of Afghanistan. We are watching as the leaders we once trained, are now trainers, training their own Afghan students to be tomorrow’s Afghan leaders. The leader development and training that is happening now is the key that will make the 2014 transition smooth.

    August 20, 2011 at 2:14 am | Reply
  3. David Lewis

    Since the NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan was stood up over 21 months ago, we can say that developing the Afghan forces is well on track. There are 33 countries, under NATO command, which are dedicated and committed to ensuring that Afghanistan’s security institutions (Army, Air Force, and Police) are self-sufficient, self-sustaining, and enduring.

    Over the past two years, an additional 113,000 Afghan soldiers and police have been trained and are working with 130,000 NATO. In seven areas of Afghanistan, encompassing 20 percent of the population, Afghan Army and Police are already leading security efforts. Local militias are integrating into the formal security structure; commerce is returning; and schools are opening. GDP has increased from $170 under the Taliban to $1,000 per capita in 2010, almost all Afghans now have access to basic health services (only nine percent did in 2002), school enrollment increased from 900,000 (mainly boys) to almost seven million (37 percent girls), and women now serve in government. Most of the country is now connected via mobile phones and highways. The powerful force of social media is altering the landscape as over one million Afghans have internet access and over 215,000 have facebook accounts.

    There are still untold challenges ahead but the force of 2011 has little resemblance to the one NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan began advising two years ago. Over the next several years, the force will develop key support forces such as logistics, human resources, and finance. Professionalizing the force is a key to creating enduring institutions and reducing Afghan reliance on ISAF for combat support. As Afghans assume the security lead, NTM-A’s focus shifts to training the trainer.

    Any reference to the ‘Bear coming over the mountain’ would seem irresponsible and derisory. The Afghan people are working successfully with hundreds of NTM-A advisors from around the globe. Together with international partners they are developing leaders, establishing enduring institutions, and creating a self sustainable, autonomous Afghan National Security Force. The progress is astounding. The mountains belong to the Afghan people, and with the help of the world community, the Afghans are reclaiming them.

    August 18, 2011 at 8:21 am | Reply
  4. helenecha

    What's the matter with that move? After all, it's neither the banker's nor the winner's.

    August 17, 2011 at 11:17 pm | Reply
  5. Ahmad

    One thing is proven here once again! Afghans don't make good slaves, no matter how many years of training. Try Hindus or pakies.

    August 17, 2011 at 4:22 pm | Reply
    • Yakobi

      Remember the old saying, one can rent a Afghan but can not buy it, nor are all Pakistanis but one can bet his money on hindus (slaves) from hindered (gutter) land called India, they are brad into gentilism (slavery) and masters of hinduism (boot licking)

      August 17, 2011 at 4:29 pm | Reply
  6. Yakobi

    Afghan hindu gentiles (criminal slaves) trained by their westren hindu sanatans (racist criminals) masters are not trained to help Afgnans but their westren hindu (criminals) hiding behind thick walls in Afghnistan.

    August 17, 2011 at 3:15 pm | Reply
    • yousaf

      Hey try and be a bit nicer in life. It actually feels good. try it once in your life.

      August 17, 2011 at 3:43 pm | Reply
      • Yakobi

        being nice is not good enough but truth brings peace, one may find it nice to fulfil his hindu soul (filthy desire) in hinduism (illegality)) as is the case with western hindus (terrorist) and their Afghan hindu gentiles (criminal slaves)

        August 17, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
  7. USMC_0311

    10yrs of training can make the average man James Bond. 10yrs of training makes these incompetent fools average. Old ammo pouches? WTF! Anyone else would adapt and overcome...its called duct tape for Christs sake. I can tell you from personal experience there is one thing they have plenty of on their person at all times...Hashish. GET OUT OF THIS SHIT HOLE NOW!!!

    August 17, 2011 at 3:10 pm | Reply
  8. Mike

    I agree. Read Bear Came Over The Mountain. Maybe they can learn about how the Russians thought they took over Afghanistan, only to watch their military be destroyed.

    August 17, 2011 at 2:22 pm | Reply
    • David BenLevi

      There are still untold challenges ahead but the force of 2011 has little resemblance to the one NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan began advising two years ago. Over the next several years, the force will develop key support forces such as logistics, human resources, and finance. Professionalizing the force is a key to creating enduring institutions and reducing Afghan reliance on ISAF for combat support. As Afghans assume the security lead, NTM-A’s focus shifts to training the trainer.

      Since the NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan was stood up over 21 months ago, we can say that developing the Afghan forces is well on track. There are 33 countries, under NATO command, which are dedicated and committed to ensuring that Afghanistan’s security institutions (Army, Air Force, and Police) are self-sufficient, self-sustaining, and enduring.

      Over the past two years, an additional 113,000 Afghan soldiers and police have been trained and are working with 130,000 NATO. In seven areas of Afghanistan, encompassing 20 percent of the population, Afghan Army and Police are already leading security efforts. Local militias are integrating into the formal security structure; commerce is returning; and schools are opening. GDP has increased from $170 under the Taliban to $1,000 per capita in 2010, almost all Afghans now have access to basic health services (only nine percent did in 2002), school enrollment increased from 900,000 (mainly boys) to almost seven million (37 percent girls), and women now serve in government. Most of the country is now connected via mobile phones and highways. The powerful force of social media is altering the landscape as over one million Afghans have internet access and over 215,000 have facebook accounts.

      Any reference to the ‘Bear coming over the mountain’ would seem irresponsible and derisory. The Afghan people are working successfully with hundreds of NTM-A advisors from around the globe. Together with international partners they are developing leaders, establishing enduring institutions, and creating a self sustainable, autonomous Afghan National Security Force. The progress is astounding. The mountains belong to the Afghan people, and with the help of the world community, the Afghans are reclaiming them.

      August 18, 2011 at 8:25 am | Reply
  9. Pliny

    Will someone in this administration, ANYONE, please pickup a history book and read about afghanistan.

    And then, please get our troops and our money OUT of that place.

    August 17, 2011 at 1:03 pm | Reply

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